Speaker Series, “The National Park Service: Inspiring a Nation to Protect America’s Lands”

Program Description:

The National Park Service was created in 1916 due to the efforts of Stephen T. Mather and Horace M. Albright, along with countless other people. Join Park Ranger Pam Tripp to hear about the early creation of this then new government agency and it’s protected lands. Pam’s talk is based on the book Creating the National Park Service; The Missing Years, by Horace M. Albright and Marian Albright Schenck.

Speaker Bio:

Pam Tripp has been with the National Park Service since 2002, working in the interpretation and education division at Joshua Tree National Park and now Casa Grande Ruins National Monument.  Pam is fascinated with history and the historical places that the National Park Service protects.

Program Description:

Although the desert may seem like a desolate landscape devoid of life, it is actually home to hundreds of unique species. Some are only visible or appear alive for a short time, others grow for hundreds of years, and many are not found anywhere else on earth. Participants will learn about the many traditional Tribal plants uses, what plant life makes North American Deserts so unique, and how the Mojave stands apart from the rest of America.

Speaker Bio:

Carrie Cannon is a member of the Kiowa tribe of Oklahoma and is also of Oglala Lakota descent. She has a B.S. in Wildlife Biology, and an M.S. in Resource Management. She began working for the Hualapai Tribe of Peach Springs, Arizona in 2005 where she began the creation of an intergenerational ethnobotany program for the Hualapai community. She is currently employed as an Ethnobotanist for the Hualapai Department of Cultural Resources. She administers a number of projects promoting the intergenerational teaching of Hualapai ethnobotanical knowledge working towards preservation and revitalization to ensure tribal ethnobotanical knowledge persists as a living practice and tradition.

Program Description:

This visual presentation shows how Indigenous American women have contributed service to Arizona and the US yet were stereotyped in films and remain invisible in the media. Nevertheless, they have been honored in all areas of public service—law, medicine, literature, military and activism with awards such as, the Presidential Freedom, the McArthur (genius award), the Secretary of Interior, and others. Among some traditional tribal cultures, women’s lives are modeled after female heroes and sacred women who exemplify and express courage and kinship values. Rites of passage celebrate female creativity and the transformative nature of women, hence there was not a need for the concept of feminism. This talk presents cultural aspects of Indigenous culture and how women have contributed in significant ways, not only to their tribal nations, but to contemporary American life.

Speaker Bio:

Laura Tohe is Diné and the current Navajo Nation Poet Laureate. She is Sleepy Rock People clan and born for the Bitter Water People clan and the daughter of a Navajo Code Talker. She published 3 books of poetry, an anthology of Native women’s writing and an oral history on the Navajo Code Talkers. Her librettos, Enemy Slayer, A Navajo Oratorio (2008) and Nahasdzáán in the Glittering World (2021), performed in Arizona and France, respectively. Among her awards are the 2020 Academy of American Poetry Fellowship and the 2019 American Indian Festival of Writers Award. She is Professor Emerita with Distinction from ASU.

Program Description:

Ancient American Indian petroglyphs (symbols carved or pecked on rocks) and pictographs (rock paintings) are claimed by some to be forms of writing for which meanings are known. But are such claims supported by archaeology or by Native Americans? Archaeologist Allen Dart illustrates how petroglyph and pictograph styles changed through time and over different parts of the U.S. Southwest both before and after non-Indian peoples entered the region and discusses how even the same rock art symbol may be interpreted differently from popular, scientific, and modern Native American perspectives.

Speaker Bio:

Registered Professional Archaeologist Allen has worked in Arizona and New Mexico since 1975 for federal and state governments, private companies, and nonprofit organizations. He is the executive director of Tucson’s nonprofit Old Pueblo Archaeology Center, which he founded in 1993 to provide educational and scientific programs in archaeology, history, and cultures. Al has been an Arizona Humanities speaker since 1997. He has received the Arizona Archaeological Society’s Professional Archaeologist of the Year Award, the Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society’s Victor R. Stoner Award, the Arizona Governor’s Archaeology Advisory Commission Award in Public Archaeology, and other honors for his efforts to bring archaeology and history to the public.

COOLIDGE, AZ – The Casa Grande Ruins Speaker Series takes place weekly through January 18, 2023. On November 16, 2022 Casa Grande Ruins will host Sistine Lewis at 1:00 pm.  Sistine will present “O’odham Dresses through the Decades”. The speaker series will continue every Wednesday at 1:00 pm through January 18.

Sistine Lewis, is the daughter of Cecilia Andrews and the Late Knute Lewis. Sistine is a member of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community and this years’ Miss Indian Arizona 2022-2023. She is the 4th woman from her community to hold this title as she now represents all 22 federally recognized tribes across the state. As Miss Indian Arizona her platform is: Promoting Culture amongst the youth, “our youth are next generation, and I would love to connect with youth on and off the reservation involved with their cultures”.

Sistine is currently attending Scottsdale Community College in the Honors Program where she is majoring in Nursing to become a future Labor and Delivery nurse, to help welcome newborn babies while also providing a safe environment for mothers.

Sistine will be sharing the history of O’odham dresses and how they’ve evolved through time. There will also be in-person visualization of the unique collection of O’odham traditional dresses.